About Rope



Polypropylene (PP), also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications. It is produced via chain-growth polymerization from the monomer propylene. Polypropylene belongs to the group of polyolefins and is partially crystalline and non-polar. Its properties are similar to polyethylene, but it is slightly harder and more heat resistant. It is a white, mechanically rugged material and has a high chemical resistance.[1] Polypropylene is the second-most widely produced commodity plastic (after polyethylene) and it is often used in packaging and labeling. In 2013, the global market for polypropylene was about 55 million tonnes











ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT



The production of the PVC used in the production of many artificial leathers requires a plasticizer called a phthalate to make it flexible and soft. PVC requires petroleum and large amounts of energy thus making it reliant on fossil fuels. During the production process carcinogenic byproducts, dioxins, are produced which are toxic to humans and animals. Dioxins remain in the environment long after PVC is manufactured. When PVC ends up in a landfill it does not decompose like genuine leather and can release dangerous chemicals into the water and soil. Polyurethane is currently more popular for use than PVC.



USES



Artificial leathers are often used in clothing fabrics, furniture upholstery, and automotive uses. One disadvantage of plastic-coated artificial leather is that it is not porous and does not allow air to pass through thus, sweat can accumulate if it is used for clothing, car seat coverings, etc. One of its primary advantages, especially in cars, is that it requires little maintenance in comparison to leather, and does not crack or fade easily